• 3D printed hearts- a real possibility?

    A team from the ETH University in Zurich has managed to 3D print a soft silicone heart that pumps in a way similar to a normal human heart. The hope is that this could one day provide a viable alternative to a human to human heart transplants.

    You can watch a video of the heart being tested below:

    Please click here to see the video


    The human heart is one of the most complex organs in the body with various chambers, ventricles, arteries and blood vessels and very often transplanted hearts are rejected by the donor body. This newly developed silicone heart behaves very much like a human heart and has a pump within it to move blood around the body. However, his prototype can only pump 3000 times (about half an hour) before the material starts breaking down.

    With advancements in 3D printing, it has become easier to print soft shapes, something which is opening up new possibilities such as printing organs.

    I’m interested to know your thoughts about the topic? Is 3D printing organs a step too far? Or are you excited by the possibilities that advancements in this technology can provide?

    Share your thoughts with the community below.

    Amy
    Last edited by Amy Brunsdon; 24-07-2017 at 10:59 AM.
    0
  • A team from the ETH University in Zurich has managed to 3D print a soft silicone heart that pumps in a way similar to a normal human heart. The hope is that this could one day provide a viable alternative to a human to human heart transplants.

    You can watch a video of the heart being tested below:

    Please click here to see the video


    The human heart is one of the most complex organs in the body with various chambers, ventricles, arteries and blood vessels and very often transplanted hearts are rejected by the donor body. This newly developed silicone heart behaves very much like a human heart and has a pump within it to move blood around the body. However, his prototype can only pump 3000 times (about half an hour) before the material starts breaking down.

    With advancements in 3D printing, it has become easier to print soft shapes, something which is opening up new possibilities such as printing organs.

    I’m interested to know your thoughts about the topic? Is 3D printing organs a step too far? Or are you excited by the possibilities that advancements in this technology can provide?

    Share your thoughts with the community below.

    Amy
  • Hi @Amy Brunsdon.

    I see significant upside of this technology. This is no longer just printing small toys or bottle tops. The whole area of 3D printing has shifted and is dragging the rest of the engineering world with it.

    Allowing this to happen is the ever growing technology in peoples homes and the want to have instant results. I do not see printing a 3D heart as a step to far and is taking the technology to a place where it is naturally best suited. Once this avenue completes then the following phases of adoption will take place (like having a computer in every home).

    I do see resistance from all corners such as legal aspects (printing 3D weapons etc) through to legacy control of manufacturing services (such as machine tool builders) even to scrap metal merchants (who enjoy seeing you cut round items from square plate and sctapping 30% of the material).

    It is in a good place at the moment and will be exciting to see how it moves more into the main stream over the next few years.
    0
  • Hi @Amy Brunsdon.

    I see significant upside of this technology. This is no longer just printing small toys or bottle tops. The whole area of 3D printing has shifted and is dragging the rest of the engineering world with it.

    Allowing this to happen is the ever growing technology in peoples homes and the want to have instant results. I do not see printing a 3D heart as a step to far and is taking the technology to a place where it is naturally best suited. Once this avenue completes then the following phases of adoption will take place (like having a computer in every home).

    I do see resistance from all corners such as legal aspects (printing 3D weapons etc) through to legacy control of manufacturing services (such as machine tool builders) even to scrap metal merchants (who enjoy seeing you cut round items from square plate and sctapping 30% of the material).

    It is in a good place at the moment and will be exciting to see how it moves more into the main stream over the next few years.
  • Hi @Amy Brunsdon,

    Found this .... seems to show a real practical movement towards this. As mentioned before. Very exciting !

    https://www.ted.com/talks/neri_oxman...gy_and_biology
    0
  • Hi @Amy Brunsdon,

    Found this .... seems to show a real practical movement towards this. As mentioned before. Very exciting !

    https://www.ted.com/talks/neri_oxman...gy_and_biology
  • Thanks for sharing @Garry Clawson I love a good TED talk! I'll watch and let you know what I think
    Last edited by Amy Brunsdon; 07-09-2017 at 09:09 AM.
    1
  • Thanks for sharing @Garry Clawson I love a good TED talk! I'll watch and let you know what I think