• Can the UK avoid a Brexit legislative minefield for manufacturers?

    I wanted to share an interesting blog post by Tim Thomas, EEF's Director of Employment and Skills, on the implications of legislation for manufacturers in the case of a no deal Brexit.

    In this blog Tim suggests that businesses should read the small print in any transactions they are making in preparation for Brexit day 1 so they are prepared for a situation where EU laws are no longer applicable to them.

    To read the blog please click here

    Join the conversation now and let us know what you think about how legislative changes could affect UK manufacturers.
    1
  • I wanted to share an interesting blog post by Tim Thomas, EEF's Director of Employment and Skills, on the implications of legislation for manufacturers in the case of a no deal Brexit.

    In this blog Tim suggests that businesses should read the small print in any transactions they are making in preparation for Brexit day 1 so they are prepared for a situation where EU laws are no longer applicable to them.

    To read the blog please click here

    Join the conversation now and let us know what you think about how legislative changes could affect UK manufacturers.
  • Hello @Daniel Kirmatzis,

    Thanks for sharing the article. An interesting read. A takeaway for me is that in the middle of uncertainty advantage can be taken, be this for the positive or the negative. Large or medium size manufacturers may perhaps have applied resource to review and co-ordinate systems and processes to mitigate but others may be watching organisations like the EEF for guidance and updates.

    It is important for the EEF and other similar organisations to take the lead and help support clarity for manufacturers as the brexit process continues and after.
    1
  • Hello @Daniel Kirmatzis,

    Thanks for sharing the article. An interesting read. A takeaway for me is that in the middle of uncertainty advantage can be taken, be this for the positive or the negative. Large or medium size manufacturers may perhaps have applied resource to review and co-ordinate systems and processes to mitigate but others may be watching organisations like the EEF for guidance and updates.

    It is important for the EEF and other similar organisations to take the lead and help support clarity for manufacturers as the brexit process continues and after.
  • Hello @Garry Clawson ,

    you are absolutely right and EEF is here to listen to manufacturers' concerns and questions about the Brexit process.

    What do you see as the main challenges facing manufacturers today as Brexit negotiations continue?
    1
  • Hello @Garry Clawson ,

    you are absolutely right and EEF is here to listen to manufacturers' concerns and questions about the Brexit process.

    What do you see as the main challenges facing manufacturers today as Brexit negotiations continue?
  • Hi @Daniel Kirmatzis,

    Thanks for the reply. It is a big question and I admit to not knowing the answer. My thoughts are currently around a few points.

    1. Knowledge sharing & skills development

    For me this is cross training across business units but also importantly university co-operation and best practice development.


    2. Currency

    This for me is an unknown. I think this hinges on how the Euro group move forwards with further integration of countries into the euro over the next few years. I think there will be (and is) significant pressure on driving down the UKs competitive advantage of which a main one is the £ sterling.

    However, my thoughts have probably been coloured as I have just recently finished Yanis Varoufakis: Adults in the Room !
    1
  • Hi @Daniel Kirmatzis,

    Thanks for the reply. It is a big question and I admit to not knowing the answer. My thoughts are currently around a few points.

    1. Knowledge sharing & skills development

    For me this is cross training across business units but also importantly university co-operation and best practice development.


    2. Currency

    This for me is an unknown. I think this hinges on how the Euro group move forwards with further integration of countries into the euro over the next few years. I think there will be (and is) significant pressure on driving down the UKs competitive advantage of which a main one is the £ sterling.

    However, my thoughts have probably been coloured as I have just recently finished Yanis Varoufakis: Adults in the Room !
  • Hi @Garry Clawson ,

    Many thanks for this Garry.

    Skills in particular is hugely important. Trying to align college and university courses with the needs of businesses will be key to success. It would be interesting to hear what skills and requirements manufacturers need both now and in the foreseeable future in order to sustain and grow their operations.

    For example - what would manufacturers like from FE and HE courses that they believe are not currently being catered for?

    This is the ideal place to get this type of conversation started.

    As for currency this is the great unknown.

    Best regards,

    Daniel.
    1
  • Hi @Garry Clawson ,

    Many thanks for this Garry.

    Skills in particular is hugely important. Trying to align college and university courses with the needs of businesses will be key to success. It would be interesting to hear what skills and requirements manufacturers need both now and in the foreseeable future in order to sustain and grow their operations.

    For example - what would manufacturers like from FE and HE courses that they believe are not currently being catered for?

    This is the ideal place to get this type of conversation started.

    As for currency this is the great unknown.

    Best regards,

    Daniel.
  • Hi @Daniel Kirmatzis,

    "For example - what would manufacturers like from FE and HE courses that they believe are not currently being catered for?"

    It is not what is currently not being catered for as I think that is a different question but to provide some perspective to this I would say cheaper more flexible technical courses that would enable a whole workforce to be up-skilled rather than a few.

    My reference would be to skills that are tied into higher education institutes and being driven by the collaboration of both that may be lost or reduced. A great example of collaboration is Siemens UK tie in with Lincoln University. This is a fantastic and collaborative effort that is driving forward a whole range of skills across the power generation sector. This is high value specialized engineering that the UK should be continually aiming for. This link details more about this https://www.praxisunico.org.uk/sites...y_short_02.pdf

    Another example is University West of England collaboration with Airbus near Filton (Bristol) See link for further details: https://info.uwe.ac.uk/news/uwenews/news.aspx?id=3240

    My concern is that this type of collaboration could be reduced which will have a knock on negative affect towards apprenticeships and other technical careers as well as a reduction in associated skills in the region. It is reported that Manufacturing apprenticeships are not in the top 5 of highest paying apprenticeships in the country and unless we continue to build together (industry and academia) this will further decline as folks move towards more prominent, popular or fashionable industries.

    The above are some examples in my mind that the Brexit will make harder and I think could be accelerated if not adequately considered through the process.

    Great to hear other views thoughts on this or different aspects of the Brexit on manufacturing in the UK. Not just through the process but also after the Brexit has completed.
    1
  • Hi @Daniel Kirmatzis,

    "For example - what would manufacturers like from FE and HE courses that they believe are not currently being catered for?"

    It is not what is currently not being catered for as I think that is a different question but to provide some perspective to this I would say cheaper more flexible technical courses that would enable a whole workforce to be up-skilled rather than a few.

    My reference would be to skills that are tied into higher education institutes and being driven by the collaboration of both that may be lost or reduced. A great example of collaboration is Siemens UK tie in with Lincoln University. This is a fantastic and collaborative effort that is driving forward a whole range of skills across the power generation sector. This is high value specialized engineering that the UK should be continually aiming for. This link details more about this https://www.praxisunico.org.uk/sites...y_short_02.pdf

    Another example is University West of England collaboration with Airbus near Filton (Bristol) See link for further details: https://info.uwe.ac.uk/news/uwenews/news.aspx?id=3240

    My concern is that this type of collaboration could be reduced which will have a knock on negative affect towards apprenticeships and other technical careers as well as a reduction in associated skills in the region. It is reported that Manufacturing apprenticeships are not in the top 5 of highest paying apprenticeships in the country and unless we continue to build together (industry and academia) this will further decline as folks move towards more prominent, popular or fashionable industries.

    The above are some examples in my mind that the Brexit will make harder and I think could be accelerated if not adequately considered through the process.

    Great to hear other views thoughts on this or different aspects of the Brexit on manufacturing in the UK. Not just through the process but also after the Brexit has completed.